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Many people who serve in the military obtain medical treatment through governmental health systems. Doctors employed by the government are required to comply with the same standard of care imposed on other physicians, and if they do not, they can be held accountable for any harm they cause. A plaintiff alleging a government employee committed medical malpractice is held to a different requirements than those pursuing claims against private workers, however, and if they do not comply with them, their claims may be dismissed. In a recent ruling, a New York court explained the obligations imposed on a person pursuing claims against the government in a case in which the plaintiff alleged losses due to the negligence of her plastic surgeons. If you suffered injuries during a cosmetic procedure, you should speak to a Syracuse plastic surgeon malpractice lawyer to discuss what you must prove to recover damages.

The Plaintiff’s Harm

It is reported that the plaintiff, a former member of the United States armed forces, suffered a back injury in 2009. She was treated at a hospital owned by the defendant government agency for back pain, neck pain, and headaches caused by her injury. Doctors employed by the defendant advised her that if she underwent a breast reduction, it would lessen her symptoms. She ultimately underwent a bilateral breast reduction which was performed by the defendant’s doctors. Following the surgery, she experienced pain, deformities, and significant scarring.

Allegedly, the plaintiff submitted an administrative claim to the defendant, setting forth the basis of her claim and the injuries sustained. She did not, however, indicate that she intended to pursue damages for lack of informed consent. The defendant denied her claim, after which she filed a lawsuit seeking damages for medical malpractice. She then moved to amend her complaint to include a claim for lack of informed consent. Continue reading

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Medical malpractice cases filed in federal court are often subject to levels of review not present at the state level. For example, if a party files a motion to dismiss or for summary judgment, the motion may be referred to a magistrate judge, who will make a recommendation to the court regarding whether to grant or deny the motion. While a magistrate’s recommendation is not binding, they are often adopted by the courts. Parties have the opportunity to object to such recommendations, however, if they are unfavorable. Recently, the United States District Court for the Northern District of New York discussed the standard of review employed when evaluating objections to magistrate recommendations in a case in which it ultimately dismissed the plaintiff’s medical malpractice claims. If you sustained damages due to incompetent medical care, it is smart to meet with a Syracuse medical malpractice attorney to determine your possible claims.

The Procedural History of the Case

It is reported that the plaintiff, who lived in a facility operated by the federal government, sought treatment for symptoms affecting his eye. He visited a doctor who worked for the facility and underwent an examination. The doctor then prescribed the plaintiff medication. The drug caused severe harm to the plaintiff’s eye.

It is alleged that the doctor also failed to treat the plaintiff’s subsequent harm in a timely manner. Thus, he filed a lawsuit against the federal government, alleging the doctor’s failure to warn the plaintiff of the potential risks associated with the medication and the failure to provide prompt treatment for his resulting harm constituted medical malpractice. Following discovery, the government moved for summary judgment. The motion was reviewed by a magistrate judge, who issued a report and recommendation that the court grant the motion. The plaintiff then objected. Continue reading

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In New York, the terms medical malpractice and medical negligence are often used interchangeably. While they have similar meanings, there are differences between the two, and they impose distinctive burdens of proof on plaintiffs asserting them as causes of action. The was demonstrated in a recent opinion issued by a New York court in a case arising out of primary care malpractice. If you suffered harm due to the careless acts of your physician, it is important to understand what evidence you must produce to recover damages, and you should speak to a Syracuse primary care malpractice lawyer about your rights.

The Decedent’s Harm

It is reported that the decedent was living in a state-owned facility. He visited the infirmary with complaints of chest pain that radiated down his arm lasting two hours. The nurse at the infirmary attempted to conduct an EKG, but the machine used to perform the test was inoperable. She then contacted the defendant medical center to perform telehealth services for the decedent. The attending physician’s assistant contemplated ordering an EKG but did not because the decedent’s vital signs were normal.

Allegedly, after the telehealth consultation ended, the nurse gave the decedent medication, and he returned to his room. He returned to the infirmary a second time, at which point the EKG machine was working. An EKG revealed he was having a heart attack, and he was transferred to a hospital. He subsequently filed a lawsuit against the state, alleging, among other things, medical negligence. The state moved to dismiss the plaintiff’s claims via summary judgment, but the court found that there was a genuine factual dispute as to whether the state deviated from the accepted standard of care. Continue reading

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It is well-established that people harmed by medical malpractice have the right to seek compensation from the parties responsible for their injuries. While it is not required for a plaintiff in a medical malpractice case to be represented by an attorney, it is prudent, as most people outside of the legal arena do not understand the requirements imposed by procedural rules and are likely to make mistakes that can adversely impact their claims. This was illustrated in a recent ruling in which a New York court dismissed a plaintiff’s claims seeking damages for medical malpractice due to lack of jurisdiction over the matter. If you were hurt by negligent medical care, you could be owed damages, and you should engage the services of a Syracuse medical malpractice lawyer to aid you in pursuing your claims.

Procedural History of the Case

It is reported that the plaintiff filed a lawsuit in federal court against the state, asserting numerous claims, including medical malpractice. She filed the complaint without the assistance of an attorney. The precise nature of the medical treatment she received and the harm that arose from such care was not disclosed in the court’s opinion. She moved to proceed in forma pauperis; as such, the court conducted its two-part analysis, first determining if she qualified for in forma pauperis status and then screening her complaint to evaluate if it was within the court’s jurisdiction.

It is alleged that while the court granted her motion to proceed in forma pauperis, it found that the complaint did not provide grounds for federal jurisdiction. It provided the plaintiff leave to amend her complaint, which she did. The court determined her amended complaint to be devoid of grounds for jurisdiction as well and subsequently dismissed her claims. Continue reading

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In medical malpractice cases, the task of evaluating a plaintiff’s damages is usually assigned to the jury. While assessing the cost of past and future medical care is a relatively straightforward task, determining the value of the suffering and pain endured by the plaintiff is not a clear-cut process. As such, the jury may issue a verdict that does not align with the evidence produced at trial. In such instances, either party can move to set the verdict aside, but establishing that a jury’s damages award is inappropriate can prove difficult. Recently, a New York court discussed the standards used in evaluating whether a verdict should be vacated in an opinion issued in a nursing malpractice case. If you were injured due to negligent nursing care, you could be owed damages, and it is in your best interest to meet with a Syracuse nursing malpractice lawyer to discuss your options.

The Decedent’s Harm

It is reported that the decedent was receiving care in a long-term nursing facility when he choked on a piece of food. He subsequently suffered a heart attack, lapsed into a coma, and died several weeks later. The plaintiff, the representative of the decedent’s estate, filed a malpractice lawsuit against the defendant facility. The complaint alleged that the nurse that performed CPR on the decedent failed to check his airway for an obstruction, which constituted a departure from the standard of care.

Allegedly, the complaint further asserted that the nurse’s breach of the standard was a substantial factor in bringing about the decedent’s harm. The case proceeded to trial, and the jury issued a verdict granting the plaintiff $300,000 for the decedent’s conscious pain and suffering. The plaintiff then moved to set aside the verdict on the issue of damages as against the weight of the evidence. The court denied the motion, and the plaintiff appealed. Continue reading

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In many instances, parties that suffer harm due to medical negligence will sustain other damages as well, such as losses caused by violations of their civil rights. Thus, they will often choose to pursue claims for damages in federal court. While federal courts can exercise supplemental jurisdiction over state law claims in certain circumstances, if the basis for such jurisdiction is removed, the courts will typically decline to exercise jurisdiction over such claims. This was demonstrated in a ruling recently issued in a New York case in a matter arising out of physical therapy malpractice. If you sustained injuries due to the negligence of a physical therapist, it is smart to speak to a skillful Syracuse physical therapy malpractice lawyer regarding your potential claims.

The Plaintiff’s Harm

It is reported that the plaintiff, who is a paraplegic, underwent a physical therapy session with the defendant. During the session, the defendant placed a hot pack on the plaintiff’s lower back and advised him to leave it there. The plaintiff subsequently suffered second-degree burns, which he alleged caused emotional trauma and mental distress in addition to physical pain. He filed a lawsuit against the defendant, asserting medical malpractice claims as well as claims arising under federal law. The defendant moved to have the plaintiff’s claims dismissed in their entirety. The court ultimately ruled in favor of the defendant and dismissed the plaintiff’s claims.

Supplemental Jurisdiction Over State Law Claims Filed in Federal Court

The court concluded that the plaintiff failed to assert viable federal claims. Thus, it dismissed the counts in his complaint that arose under federal law. The court also declined to exercise jurisdiction over the plaintiff’s medical malpractice claim, which arose under state law, unless the plaintiff was able to amend his complaint to assert a viable federal claim. Continue reading

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Typically, medical malpractice cases arising out of incompetent medical care rendered in New York are filed in state court. Plaintiffs are not precluded from pursuing claims in federal court, but if they do so they must establish that jurisdiction is proper; otherwise, their claims may be dismissed. Recently, a New York court discussed federal diversity jurisdiction over medical malpractice cases in a matter in which the plaintiff asserted numerous claims against multiple defendants. If you suffered harm because of incompetent medical care, it is critical to retain a Syracuse medical malpractice lawyer to assist you in pursuing any compensation you may be owed.

The Plaintiff’s Allegations

It is alleged that the plaintiff filed a federal lawsuit asserting numerous claims against multiple parties, including a medical malpractice claim against the defendant hospital. Specifically, the plaintiff alleged the defendant hospital unjustly discharged him and unlawfully shared his confidential health records with third parties. The defendant hospital moved to dismiss the plaintiff’s medical malpractice claims on the grounds that the court lacked subject matter jurisdiction over them. After reviewing the pleadings, the court agreed and dismissed the plaintiff’s medical malpractice claims without prejudice.

Federal Diversity Jurisdiction in Medical Malpractice Cases

Pursuant to federal law, district courts have jurisdiction over civil claims if the amount in controversy exceeds $75,000, and the dispute is between citizens of different states. The courts strictly construe the law against finding jurisdiction. Further, the law requires that, in federal actions in which jurisdiction is premised on diversity, complete diversity of citizenship must exist when the plaintiff institutes the action. Continue reading

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In New York, it is not uncommon for a person to receive medical care in a facility owned by a municipality. Doctors that work for municipalities, like other physicians, can make harmful mistakes, and while parties can seek compensation from municipalities via medical malpractice suits, they must comply with certain notice requirements to protect their claims. Recently, a New York court issued an opinion warning of the consequences of failing to comply with notice requirements in cases against municipalities, in a matter in which it ultimately dismissed the plaintiff’s claims. If you were hurt by incompetent medical care in a municipal facility, it is smart to speak to a Syracuse medical malpractice lawyer regarding what you must do to protect your rights.

The Plaintiff’s Harm

It is reported that the plaintiff entered a municipally owned facility, and during her admission process, advised the defendant nurse that she was prescribed numerous medications that she must continue to take to maintain her health. She was administered some, but not all, of her medications. She later met with the defendant psychiatrist and advised she felt a manic episode coming on.

Allegedly, she was not provided the psychiatric medication she needed to manage her symptoms regardless of her requests. She subsequently filed a lawsuit against the defendants and other parties, asserting numerous claims. The defendants moved for dismissal, while the plaintiff moved for permission to amend her complaint to add medical malpractice claims against the defendants. The defendants opposed the plaintiff’s motion. Continue reading

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In New York, medical malpractice cases differ from other civil claims in multiple ways. For example, there are numerous additional pleading and evidentiary requirements imposed on plaintiffs that they must meet in order to pursue damages. If plaintiffs fail to abide by the statutory obligations, it may adversely affect their claims. For example, in a recent New York nursing malpractice case, the court discussed the implications of the failure to include a certificate of merit with an initial pleading. If you suffered harm due to the negligence of a nurse, it is prudent to consult a Syracuse nursing malpractice lawyer to discuss what evidence you must produce to recover damages.

The Plaintiff’s Claims

It is reported that the plaintiff’s decedent presented to the county courthouse in response to a warrant. As part of a routine screening, the decedent reported that he had consumed numerous illicit and prescription drugs prior to arriving at the courthouse, and during his hearing, a drug treatment coordinator advised she was concerned for his safety and he needed immediate medical care. Regardless, the judge ordered him to confinement in the county jail.

Allegedly, the defendant nurses were both working at the county jail that day and observed the decedent, who was having difficulty standing, speaking, and walking. At one point, the plaintiff spoke with one of the nurses and stated she was concerned the decedent would die if he did not receive prompt care, and the defendant nurse stated the decedent was fine. The decedent passed away to form an accidental drug overdose, and the plaintiff filed numerous claims, including medical malpractice claims against the defendants. The defendants moved to dismiss the plaintiff’s claims, arguing she failed to comply with the required procedure. Continue reading

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In New York, whether a medical malpractice case is successful typically hinges on whether the judge or jury finds either party’s expert reports to be adequate or compelling. As such, both plaintiffs and defendants will often argue the opposing party’s expert reports are deficient, or that their expert lacks the qualifications needed to offer an opinion. Recently, a New York court discussed the sufficiency of expert reports in a case in which the plaintiff alleged he suffered harm due to hospital malpractice. If you were hurt by incompetent care in a hospital, you should meet with a Syracuse hospital malpractice lawyer to determine your options for seeking damages.

The Plaintiff’s Allegations

It is reported that the plaintiff was admitted to the defendant hospital multiple times between April and July 2008. During his admissions, he developed lesions and decubitus ulcers on his legs, knees, and other areas of his body, which he asserted were caused by the negligence of the defendant’s employees. Thus, he filed a lawsuit against the defendant, seeking compensation for his harm which he asserted was caused by medical malpractice.

Allegedly, after the parties exchanged expert reports, the defendant moved for summary judgment. The plaintiff opposed the motion on the grounds that the defendant’s expert lacked the qualifications to offer an expert opinion, but the court granted it, dismissing the plaintiff’s claims. The plaintiff then appealed. Continue reading

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